Dale Alleshouse

Dale Alleshouse is a solutions architect at Callibrity. He is a 25+ year veteran developer with a passion for technology and a penchant for keeping up with software trends. He has architected and developed many different types of software in his career, including systems, robotics, and business.

    Testing and Local Development with MSSQL (2 of 2)

    06.16.22 | Dale Alleshouse
    Welcome to the second installment of this two-part blog series on creating robust automated testing and local development solutions for MSSQL. If you haven’t read the first post yet, please do so before proceeding (Testing and Local Development with MSSQL (1 of 2)) as this post builds upon concepts introduced there.

    Testing and Local Development with MSSQL (1 of 2)

    06.09.22 | Dale Alleshouse
    The most challenging part of designing an effective automated testing strategy is accurately simulating databases. Microsoft’s SQL Server (MSSQL) is particularly irksome because of its large footprint, lengthy startup time, plethora of configuration options and ability to store custom logic (stored procedures, user-defined functions, …). These characteristics make it onerous to materialize production equivalent instances within automated pipelines efficiently. This post is the first in a two-part series demonstrating a technique to assuage said difficulties.

    Coding Theory in Action

    11.12.16 | Dale Alleshouse
    Welcome to the final installment of this three-part series on coding theory. If you have not had the opportunity to read the first two pieces, it is highly recommended that you do before continuing on. They are available here:

    Coding Theory - Hamming Distance and Perfect Error Correction

    10.30.16 | Dale Alleshouse
    Welcome to the second installment of this three-part series on coding theory. If you have not had the opportunity to read the first piece, it is

    Coding Theory (Part 1 Of 3) - Coding Theory Defined

    08.13.16 | Dale Alleshouse
    Coding theory stands as a cornerstone for most of computer science. However, many programmers today have a diminutive understanding of the field at best. This